Things That Make the Scale Go Bump In The Night

The scale. Friend of few, the enemy of many.

The scale tells us one thing. Our current pull on gravity at the present moment – aka our weight. It tells us nothing else about ourselves. Not how fit we are, how nice we are, how bad we are…it only tells our weight.

The debate rages on about how to use the scale, or if to use the scale at all.

Like anything else in the fitness and diet world, it depends on the individual and their mindset.

If someone has had issues with the scale in the past, first I will look at what they were, how they handled them, and if it was a serious enough problem to avoid the scale – or if we just need to shift their mindset.

Personally – I recommend weighing daily and looking at the average of the 7 days. Or at least 4-5 days and the average of those.

I DO NOT like once per week weigh-ins. Why? Because it is a “doomsday”. The dreaded weigh-in day. And they can poorly represent what is actually happening.

Say you start at 210 pounds (on a Sunday), you would track your weight for a week like this:

Mon: 209 Tues: 209 Wed: 208 Thurs: 209  Fri:211  Sat: 209  Sun: 210

DAMN! Gained 1 pound! – this is what happens to many people. But with daily weighing…

Add up all the weights, and divide by 7 (or the number of days you weighed yourself if you didn’t do 7)

209+209+208+209+211+209+210 = 1465/7 = 209.3 (or a 0.7 lb weight loss)

THEN à enter your WEEKLY AVERAGE (209.3) as your weigh in for the week! See examples here.

Why The Scale Fluctuates

Water.

Mostly water is the cause of the ups and downs day to day. Don’t believe me?

Step on the scale. Step off, drink 16 oz. of water. Step back on. You have now gained a pound (if you haven’t, buy a new scale).

Step on the scale before you have to pee or poop. Step off. Pee or poop. Now step back on. You have lost weight! Yay 😉

Water retention is a massive cause for the scale to frustrate us. What are other things that cause water retention?

Salt

Salt pulls water – I think we all know this. If you eat super salty all day, and you listen to your body’s thirst mechanism, you probably ended up drinking much more water than normal and holding on to it.

Carbs

Carbs are awesome. But they can also bring water with them. This is why when runners carb load before a marathon, I want them to gain 2-3 pounds. This means their glycogen stores are loaded up and they are ready to dominate. Also, this is why low carb crash diets make you lose weight super fast at the start – water weight!

Also, eating too many simple carbs (sugar) without proper activity to balance it out will cause insulin levels to remain high in the body, and prolonged elevated insulin levels increase renal (kidney) retention of sodium (salt).

However, some studies have shown this process can be prevented by consuming more potassium – fruits, veggies, and even potatoes (French Fries don’t count).

Food

More food in your GI tract, more water weight is coming with it. This is just simple logic, right? If you eat a huge meal before you step on the scale, you will weigh more.

This is why I recommend weighing in the first thing in the morning, after you use the bathroom, with no clothes on – to minimize the variables that can cause a flux in water weight.

Stress

The body doesn’t know whether your stress is from exercise, work, or your kids driving you nuts – it just all adds up. Increases in stress lead to increases in the hormone cortisol, and prolonged increases in cortisol lead altered fluxes in anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) – which yes, has an ANTI DIURETIC effect, meaning you retain water.

Inflammation 

Inflammation from injury, sickness, too much exercise all can contribute. This is where daily weighing really comes in handy – and being aware of food intake (calories). You can be in a calorie deficit, and still not lose weight. How? Water.

You can be losing body fat, but gaining water weight due to inflammation – so the scale reads a zero change. How frustrating! This is why sticking it out for the long haul is important. Most people give up when they hit this point.

They are under-eating and overexercising. They are so sore, but the scale just doesn’t move! Sleep patterns become worse – and when sleep gets worse, we are more likely to drop inhibition and reach for sugary/junk foods.

This is when it might be time to assess when you last took a break. Let your body recover, less exercise is okay. Also, take a good hard look at your diet. Was it really as “clean” or balanced as you thought.

Your Period

Sorry ladies, but you’ve got it rough when it comes to the scale and how frustrating it can be. This seems to be most common in the week leading up to your period, and can be upwards of a 5-10 pound swing depending on your size! Again, this is why managing food intake and trusting in the process can be so important. If you KNOW your diet hasn’t changed, but your weight shot up, it’s likely something besides fat that triggered it…

Listen to your body here, basal metabolic rate decreases at menstruation and falls to its lowest point approximately 1 week before ovulation, subsequently rising until the beginning of the next menstrual period.

This explains the random cravings for sweets or treats, or the loss of appetite…listen to your body, and honor your hunger and fullness.

A scale is a good tool. But only one tool.

This is why we need to focus on OTHER metrics to monitor progress. Measurements, internal health, well being, performance numbers, etc.

Maybe your body isn’t ready to lose weight, and you feel like crap. You make changes in your life, feel amazing, but haven’t lost a pound – but your mood, outlook, and energy are better. Are you still going to think that that was a failure?

Look beyond the scale – but also be aware of what changes on the scale can mean.

 

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The 5 Exercise and Diet Myths That Can Go Away Now

Do you know what the WORST part about being a dietitian and trainer is? Telling complete strangers what you do at social events.

“So what do you do?” – “I’m a registered dietitian and trainer”

  • “Oh, so you are totally judging my plate right now…”
  • “What do you think about _____ diet?”
  • “I used to work out all the time.”
  • “So do you sell supplements and stuff?”
  • “I can’t believe you’re eating that”
  • “You drink alcohol?”

The list goes on and on.

I am only half kidding about that being the worst part because it usually gives me an opportunity to make a sale, and hopefully show someone that a better way is out there.

But what most people think exercise and diet have to be to see results is completely wrong.

1) Pain

Exercise and dieting do not have to involve pain. Unless making healthier choices for your future is physically painful to you. But really, physical pain with exercise is not a good thing. It is definitely NOT a sign of a good workout. Yes, you may be a little sore the day after or two, but in the muscles, and you feel like you worked out.

Sometimes it’s okay to never be sore! That sounds great, doesn’t it?

Soreness is most common when you push yourself too hard, your form gets crappy, or you add a new exercise to the mix.

All three of those things are not necessary or not recommended either! Training is a skill that must be honed in. You cannot improve a skill if you overdo it, do it sloppily, or try adding a new skill every week.

Stop going to workouts that leave you crippled, puking or passing out. And if you are a trainer who brags about these things – shame on you.

2) Suffering

“I ate a carrot and an egg for lunch today, and I am soooo hungry” 🙂

For some reason, the more hardcore someone’s diet is, the more they will tell you about it. Like a badge of honor. This is not a good path to go down, nor is it necessary.

Now, what is necessary is making realistic changes to your overall food habits if you are not happy with your health. Sitting around and wishing for results while eating way too many calories also is not a good idea.

This may take a new lens to understand.

Instead of seeing changes to your diet as suffering, look for opportunities for small changes with the least amount of stress – think of it as a pawn in chess.

Say you eat ice cream every single night. You love it. You refuse to give it up. Cool!

However, you also know that it’s probably one of the contributing factors to you not being able to lose weight. So you decide to look at the calories. “400 calories per serving”. What is a serving you ask? “Oh man, 1/2 cup! I probably eat 3 servings a night!”

So now, instead of just cutting out ice cream altogether, where can you move one space forward to make a safe, unthreatening move that won’t kill you (pawn in chess). Maybe switch to a lower calorie ice cream. Maybe cut your serving in half. Maybe only eat it on nights that start with “T”. I don’t know, that decision is up to you. But finding a small safe step is often the right move for most people.

3) Cardio for Fatloss

Cardiovascular health is important.

Having a good cardio base is very important. You should be able to get up and run an unbroken mile right now.

That being said – doing more and more cardio for fat loss is not the best idea.

When I say cardio, I’m talking traditional jogging/biking/elliptical magazine reading…you know, the things you see most people spending way too much time on.

Without addressing your diet, cardio will only take you so far. Moving your body one mile burns anywhere from 80-120 calories or so, depending on your weight. Do you know how easy it is to eat 80-120 calories? Easy like 12 almonds easy.

As much as most people don’t want to, you have to address your diet. To reiterate point 2, it doesn’t have to be as bad as you think – but change has to happen.

Traditional cardio drives up hunger hormones, increases oxidative stress in the body, and can be a terrible idea for someone overweight with bad joints in the first place!

Does this sound like something that would make your life easier? What about the Coke you drink every day…switch that to Diet Coke and you just “ran 1.2 miles”.

Increase your step count, move more in general, but don’t think you NEED to run all the time!

4) Workouts Need to Be Long

I don’t care that you spent 3 hours at the gym the other day. You clearly have more time on your hands than I, and that is awesome!

Too many people think of exercise as this all or nothing approach – especially guys.

“I used to workout 7 days per week for 2 hours per day – but now I don’t have time for that, so I don’t work out at all”. You realize how dumb this sounds, right?

If you are currently doing nothing – start with 5-10 minutes per day if you truly think that you don’t have time. Get up 5-10 minutes earlier, spend 5-10 minutes less looking at memes on Facebook. Whatever it takes…you have time.

If you need a way to plan out your day, or really self-audit your time – download this free cheat sheet, and take a good hard look at where you are actually spending your time.

You can make huge strides, build muscle, and lose fat – and your workouts can be 30 minutes long. Full honesty here – this is all relative to much more important things. You CAN get away with 30-minute workouts if you have your total steps in check, your nutrition dialed in pretty well, and you are consistent.

But for someone who is so busy that they don’t think they can work out at all, this is where I would focus my time, in this order:

  1. Monitor daily steps, come up with a goal of +2000 steps over my current level.
  2. Take an honest look at my diet – make 1 change that will make the biggest impact.
  3. Find two “time slots” to workout for 30 minutes.

Start there, and BE CONSISTENT with it…you will be surprised at what that can accomplish.

5) You Can’t Enjoy Anything That Others Do

This kind of sounds like suffering, but the context here is big.

You currently sit around, saying things like ” I wish I could do what they do, and look like they do” – when you have no IDEA what that person does. You only see a small sample size of their life. So that person that looks super fit, pigging out at a wedding dinner and slamming cocktails… maybe they eat and drink super healthy 99% of their life that you don’t see OR maybe they have a severe eating disorder and are miserable on the inside.

You. Don’t. Know!

But comparing yourself to others is the thief of joy.

What I CAN tell you is most people look at this from the wrong angle. Most people spend time and effort stressing about the little things –  about how they will handle Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years…the gauntlet of fatty holidays, what workout is best for them, should they drink vodka or tequila, squats or lunges, apple or orange.

Who cares what you do on the actual holidays!

When in reality, they are 3 days over the course of 36 days. 8%. 

If you spend so much time worrying about 8% of anything and don’t even think about the other 92%, it won’t turn out well.

Focus on what you do normally – and enjoy the hell out of holidays as they are meant to be enjoyed!

Stop looking for the best workout program, and just stick to one for more than a week!

Find a program that you enjoy, supports your goals, and just stick to it.

Stop focussing on the little things that really don’t matter.

I don’t care if you eat an apple or an orange. That is NOT your issue. I promise you that. Chicken or beef? Again – I don’t care.

I care more about what kind of fatty sauce you drown it in, how many glasses of “relaxation” you drink per night or the cookies that are always sitting on your kitchen counter.

Would you like more help on taking back your life, learning to love health and food again, and getting life long results along the way? IF so —> CHECK OUT ONLINE COACHING***

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Ladies, Do These 2 Things to Get Results…For Real

There are no magic foods that burn fat, and there are no must eat foods for optimal results. However, if there was a must-have food group or category of foods, it would be:

Protein – one of the three main macronutrients that I always seem to be talking about.

9/10 times when I first meet with a female client or go over the food journal of a client online, the first thing I notice is not enough protein.

Protein is super helpful in fat loss and then the subsequent weight loss management for a few different reasons.

  • It is key for building muscle.
  • It has the highest thermic effect of the three macros – meaning it costs about 25% of the calories from protein during digestion compared to 6% for carbs and 2% for fat.
  • It helps you feel full sooner at a meal, and helps you feel more satisfied after the meal – so you don’t have to go and snack 1 hour later.

So how much protein per day are we talking?

Well, study after study shows that 2g/kg of Bw is best. For those of you who aren’t down with the kilos, that is your BW in pounds, divided by 2.2.

Let’s take a 150 pound woman, divide by 2.2 = 68kg x 2 = 136g protein

In other words, my usual recommendation of .8-1g/lb is useful (120-150g)

How does one eat 136g of protein per day?

It may seem daunting, and there are many ways to do so, but I recommend breaking it down into more manageable windows.

Let’s say you sleep 7 hours per night (you better be!). Wake up at 6AM, and go to sleep at 11PM.

Now we have 17 hours left in the day to eat. Break that up into 3 windows (136/3= 45ish)

  • Window 1 – 6AM-11AM
  • Window 2 – 11AM – 5PM
  • Window 3 – 5PM-11PM

Now your goal is to eat 45g of protein within each one of those 3 windows. Much more manageable to be honest.

This might be one meal in each window, or 2 meals in each window, or a meal and a snack in each window…this isn’t as important as just getting enough protein in the day. It comes down to what works best for YOU.

Lastly, your sources. When we talk about protein, we mean LEAN proteins. Peanut butter, nuts, and fatty sausage have some protein in them, but they are NOT good sources of protein.

Why is this?

Peanut butter = 1 serving = 8g/protein and 16g fat. Most of the calories in PB come from fat.

Chicken Breast = 3oz. = 27g/protein and 3g fat. Most of the calories come from protein.

Other great sources:

  • Sirloin beef – 4oz – 21g
  • Chicken – 3oz – 27g
  • Cottage Cheese – 1cup – 28g
  • Egg whites – 1/2 cup – 10g
  • Greek yogurt – 1 cup – 20g
  • Pork loin – 5oz – 20g
  • Salmon – 4oz – 23g
  • Tofu – 1/2 cup – 10g
  • Protein powder – 1 scoop – 20-30g

Use those sources for most of your protein intake, figure out your three windows, and spread your needs out over those windows and you will be good to go!

What is the 2nd thing?

Strength Training

Strength training to build muscle. Not fluffy exercises, not hours on the cardio deck, not the latest late-night tv gadget – the iron. The dumbbells, the barbells, the kettlebells… the things that many women still fear.

Don’t fear them. Embrace them, embrace your strength, and celebrate what you can truly accomplish in the gym.

The gym is not a place to punish yourself, make up for meals eaten, or work out until your sins have been forgiven.

Strength training with heavy, compound movements, and yes – resting.

By properly strength training AND eating enough protein as described above, you will turn your body into a fat-melting machine, that burns more calories at rest than your friends who seem to spend hours and hour at the gym running their knees away.

Strength training requires effort, enough effort that produces tension, and that tension creates some fatigue in the muscle – and that muscle is adequately fueled with protein. This is how muscle grows.

Strength training requires YOU to challenge yourself, not the other way around. What do I mean by this? Look no further than this excellent quote from my friend Clifton Harski:

One reason that most group fitness relies on high rep / cardio-slop type workouts is that people FEEL like they are working hard…because EVENTUALLY if you do anything long enough or without enough rest, things FEEL hard.

The difference with STRENGTH training is that it should be hard/difficult almost immediately, and people are NOT often willing to work hard and push themselves.

They wait for HARD TO HAPPEN.

Instead of making HARD HAPPEN IMMEDIATELY.

The strength training approach will lead to more physique and physical capability changes OVER TIME.

And it requires that people increase their effort and intensity over time as they earn it.

Cardio slop HIIIT stuff is always hard because people just try and work at a pace and level they cannot sustain. You might even argue that because of that they never actually recover so it just keeps getting harder and their gainz keep being a thing of dreams.

I couldn’t put it any better.

You need to be willing to step up and challenge yourself in the gym – not waiting around for that 100th rep of tricep kickbacks to make your arm feel like it is falling off.

One final example to drive this home…

Let’s say your goal is to do 8 squats. First, make sure your form is perfect. Then how much weight did you use? 20 pounds. Ok – how hard was that?

Using a scale of 1-10 how hard was 8 reps with 20 pounds?

1 being no problem at all

10 being “all out effort, I cannot do another rep!”

For your working sets, you should be at 8 or 9 on this scale. 1-2 reps “left in the tank”.

If you have never actually given strength training a chance, what is there to lose? Give it a go, and give it time – you won’t be sorry!

Would you like more help on taking back your life, learning to love health and food again, and getting life long results along the way? IF so —> CHECK OUT ONLINE COACHING***

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Stay healthy my friends,

 

The 9 Essential Exercises for Serious Runners (with Videos)

Runners love to run. This is obvious. Running can also be a double-edged sword.

Some swear it is the best form of exercise, and others swear off it for life because of bad experiences.

Running can be one of the best forms of exercise and competition, and at the same time can be one of the most stressful and injurious forms of exercise.

Running is a fantastic way to improve your physical, and mental health, your internal and external health, and meet a lot of awesome people.

When you run, your foot strikes the ground, one foot at a time, with the force of 3 to 4 times your body weight on the joints of the hip, knee, and ankle.

What most of them need is not more running, but more strength training. Appropriate strength training. The right kind of strength training…if they want to maximize their potential.

Because of the impact and stress on the joints, and most people’s running form, the muscles of the lower body can often get imbalanced. The quads get dominant and the posterior chain becomes underused and weak.

The goal of strength training for runners should be to balance out the lower body, and also strengthen the most powerful muscles of the lower body – the hamstrings and the glutes.

Here are 9 exercises you should be doing regularly as a runner, and doing them well! They are in no particular order of importance but are in order from most basic to most advanced.

1) Body Weight Glute Bridge

The most foundational exercise for the glutes (your booty). Make sure your heels are about a hands length away from your butt, flatten your back before bridging up, then drive your hips up toward the sky, and squeeze your cheeks together like never before.

Add a pause at the top to make sure you are feeling it in your glutes, and if you have a hard time flattening your lower back, try lifting your head slightly – as seen in the video.

2) Single-Leg Foot Elevated Glute Bridge

Running is done on one foot at a time, so it makes sense to train each leg individually. This helps balance out the muscles left to right and find weak links from left to right.

Start with your foot up on a bench (or windowsill) at a height that allows you to start at a 90-degree bend at the hip and a 90-degree bend at the knee.

Flatten your back, and pull your other knee toward your chest.

Drive the arch of the working foot into the bench (or windowsill), drive your hips up while maintaining that 90 degree bend in your knee.

3) Weighted Glute Bridge Variations

The final step of training the glutes for power is loading them up with some weight. This isn’t your 100 rep booty bump Bootcamp challenge, but REAL strength training. Aim for reps of 6 to 12, get a strong squeeze, and feel the glute pump.

These 3 variations go from easiest to hardest.

With the B-Stance, you are really only using one leg, and the other is just resting on the floor as a sort of kickstand. So in the above video, I am working my left glute, and my right foot is just helping with balance.

4) Hamstring Curls

Now that we have covered the powerhouse of the lower body, lets shift gears and talk hamstrings.

Using a stability ball, drive your hips up and curl your heels in towards your butt – the KEY is keeping your hips up. If you drop your hips and curl in like many people tend to do, you lose all tension and synergy from the hamstrings into the hips…and that is the whole point of the exercise!

Notice in the video, how at the top of the curl, you could draw a straight line from my knees to my shoulders. That is the goal.

5) Romanian Deadlifts (RDL’s)

This is a pure hip hinge – and it lights up the hamstrings when done right. Start with a soft bend in your knees, but from there, drive your hips back, not down.

Pretend like you are trying to push a desk drawer shut with your butt because your hands are full and you are too lazy to turn around.

Keep your back flat from your head to your tailbone. Do NOT round your back forward, or keep your head pulled up and back – keep your spine locked at neutral and head on straight in line with your chest.

In this video, I am using a barbell – but you can do this movement pattern with dumbbells, kettlebells, sandbags, or a small child.

You can also progress to the much harder single leg RDL, but make sure you have your hip hinge form down first!

6) Split Squats

To integrate the hips, glutes, quads, and hamstrings as one in the best way possible for runners, look no further than single leg split squat and lunge variations. Running is done on one leg at a time, so it makes sense to train one leg at a time, right?

The split variation or other single-leg variations also allow you to keep a better spinal position – and avoid the dreaded hunched over squat look that I see in so many endurance athletes. You know what I’m talking about… but this is a different story and post altogether.

**If your squat looks like this, shoot me a message and I’ll hook you up with your fix.**

* Again – these can be done with any type of weight, and the weight in multiple positions – we are just focussed on the movement pattern itself.

7) Rear Foot Elevated or Bulgarian Split Squat

Slightly more advanced, the RFE SS allows you to get a deeper stretch in your hips, and really isolate the single leg.

Slow them down, and feel the stretch. Drive your plant foot through the floor. Don’t be afraid to challenge these with heavier weights!

8) Reverse Lunge

The reverse lunge is a slightly more dynamic and advanced single-leg movement, but again – form matters. The big key to focus on here is to step back, but not JAM your foot back into the ground. Control is key, and slowing this one down is your friend.

9) Walking Lunge

The walking lunge brings it all together. Single leg work with added forward locomotion…sounds like running, right?

Keep the core tight and control each step, driving through the heel and getting the glutes firing here. Make sure you keep your front foot flat on the ground as you come up from the lunge. No tippy toes!

So there you have it, the 9 exercises all runners should be focussing on!

How and when should you do them? Great question!

I would shoot for 2-3 days per week, depending on how intense your running training is at the current moment.

From there, pick one bridge variation, one hamstring variation and one single-leg variation per day. Complete 2-4 sets of each exercise, and keep the reps between 6 and 12 reps. 

Would you like more help on taking back your life, learning to love health and food again, and getting life long results along the way? IF so —> CHECK OUT ONLINE COACHING***

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Stay healthy my friends,

 

Why Having A Nice Booty Solves All Your Problems

Now that I have your attention, I want to make one thing perfectly clear. I think everyone needs to have a nice, strong, butt. Not just because it looks good, but because it can solve so many problems (beyond just being able to fill out your jeans). All immature inappropriate comments aside, having strong glutes can be a huge benefit for many reasons.

I know this firsthand. At the end of my freshman year in college I had a cyst removed from my tailbone area, via cutting through my lower back muscles and then stitching me up with about 50 external and internal stitches. I spent the first month of that summer not being able to even sit on my butt, I had to lay sideways to prevent the stitches from ripping out.

Because of this surgery, I couldn’t do any exercises that involved hinging at the hips for about 1.5 months. After 1.5 bro-tastic upper body only months of lifting, I finally got back to being able to to do lower body. I literally had to start with 135 on the deadlift all over again because of how weak my lower back was.

Thankfully, I had a strong tush from before the surgery (from football and track), and quickly got my lifts back up. I firmly believe that having a strong posterior prior to my surgery really made my life easier afterwards, as I have heard of people taking much longer to get back to lifting pain free from similar surgeries.

The following are 5 of the best reasons to train your glutes, and train them seriously:

1) Already eluted to this – prevent injury.

Weak glutes can lead to muscular imbalances and thus leading to knee, ankle, hip and lower back pain. An imbalance in the hip can lead to excessive medial rotation of the femur – leading to knee issues. Also, when the glutes are weak, the lower back tends to take on some of the work and can become tight and/or injured. Lastly, weak glutes can lead to over active hamstrings which can cause more risk for hamstring cramps.

2) Better Athletic Performance

Have you ever seen an elite athlete with no butt? Strong glutes are essential in almost every sport. They are responsible for accelerating, decelerating, changing directions and creating explosive power in jumps. “Sprinting is one of the most effective exercises for simulating the glutes and activates 234 percent more of the gluteus maximus muscle than a vertical jump, says the glute guy, Bret Contreras, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. Athletes with strong glutes will be faster, more efficient and explosive in their movements than athletes with weaker glutes.

3) Better Exercise Performance in The Gym

Having strong glutes will help stabilize your body in any standing exercise. The gluteus medius especially helps with stability and can create a stronger base of support to push, pull or throw from. Also, having strong glutes will help your other lower body lifts increase if your goal is to get stronger.

Screen Shot 2015-06-09 at 8.02.41 AM

4) Increased Calorie Burn 

Glutes are a huge muscle in everyone, no matter what your curves look like. Every time we train them heavy and seriously, we are getting a huge muscle activation along with some great post-exercise calorie burn. Want to get the most out of your weight workouts? Skip the skimpy light weight isolation exercises and focus on hitting the big muscle groups – the glutes being one of the most important.

5) Your butt will look better (in complete seriousness here)

Have you ever heard anyone say, “I want a flatter butt!”. I didn’t think so. It is okay to train for aesthetic goals. There is nothing shallow about it. Look better, feel better or feel more confident. Physical attraction can be a huge motivator, so why not try to look a little better? The bigger reason for wanting to look better is your “Why“. Why do you want to look better? That will pull out some deeper and more motivational reasoning.

 

So how do you get a better booty?

Here is a short, but not complete list of exercises that I recommend incorporating into your workouts at least 3 days per week.

  • Deadlifts (any variation, focus on glute squeeze at the top)
  • Glute/Hip bridges (add weight to hips when form is perfected)
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFg_dB0PoJQ
  • Lunges/Split Squats
  • Banded Walks
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiD4eOaivqY (old school Bret Contreras video alert!)
  • Squats (back, front, goblet)
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xwGFn-J_Q4

Start with 2 sets of 8-12 reps of each of these with challenging weights, meaning when you get to your final rep, you should feel fatigued.

Give these a try, and you may need to buy some more curvy jeans 🙂

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